Posts Tagged ‘Laughing Lotus San Francisco’

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We Are All Made of Sacred Sound by Genevieve McClendon

Posted on: June 21st, 2017 No Comments

“I was born with music inside me. Music was one of my parts.  Like my ribs, my kidneys, my liver, my heart, like my blood.  It was a force already within me when I arrived on the scene.”

-Ray Charles

We are all made of sacred sound.  Each one of us living our own unique vibration in the orchestra of the universe.  I love even visualizing this! Nada yoga allows us to celebrate and honor the healing capacity of sound.  Nada means inner mystical sound and yoga means, union.  The union of sound within, honoring the divine sound within. One way we can empower our vibration is through mantra.  Mantra is a group of words that hold a psychological and spiritual power.  When we align a mantra to our energy system, aka chakra system, we are able to take responsibility and alchemize our very being.  Dr. David Frawley explains, when a mantra is carefully chosen and used silently, mantras are said to have the ability to help alter your subconscious impulses, habits, and afflictions. Mantras, when spoken or chanted, direct the healing power of Prana (life force energy) and, in traditional Vedic practices, can be used to energize and access spiritual states of consciousness. Mantra is a spiritual practice that should be done on a regular basis for several months for its desired effects to take place. We can empower ourselves by learning which chakras within our own energy field need support and align a mantra with that chakra. There are sacred mantras for each chakra to help create inner peace and harmony.  This map shows the chakras and the mantras that heal and align each chakra, you will know which of your chakras need support as you read:

Root Chakra-

Mantra-  Om Gum Ganapatayei Namaha

On the rainbow bridge the Root Chakra’s color is red and its sound is LAM.  It is based at the bottom of tail bone.  The Root Chakra’s energy is stability, feeling safe, security, and standing up under pressure.  When Root Chakra is out of alignment one may experience fear, insecurity, lack of courage, muscle and structural weakness, and hip, knee and foot problems.  A way to come back into harmany is to honor Ganesha, the remover of obstacles with this mantra.

2nd Chakra- Sacral Plexus

Mantra- Om Shrim Maha Lakshmyai Namaha

The Sacral Plexus is the color orange and its sound is VAM.  It is right above the Root Chakra in the pelvic bowl.  The Sacral Chakra energy radiates powerful emotional and creative forces, along with movement, sensuality, and relationship to ourselves and others.  When the Sacral Plexus is out of alignment we may feel controlling, guilty, frigid, dependent, a lack of creativity, close minded, emotionally stuck, and difficulty in relationships.

3rd Chakra- Solar Plexus

Mantra- Om Hum Hanumate Namaha

The Solar Plexus color is yellow and its sound is RAM.  It radiates in the belly right above the Sacral Plexus. This energy center holds self-confidence, self-empowerment, honesty, digesting life easily, courageousness and authenticity.  When the Solar Plexus is out of alignment one may experience shame, powerlessness, shyness, worry and victimization.

4th Chakra- Heart

Mantra- Om Shri Krishnaya Namaha

The Heart Chakra is green and its sound is HUM.  It shines at the heart and chest right above the Solar Plexus.  It is the energy center where the earth self and the divine self connect.  The Heart Chakra’s energy when in alignment is of love, compassion, forgiveness, acceptance of others, open heartedness, connected mind and heart, joyfulness, happiness, gratitude and grace.  When out of alignment the Heart Chakra may contribute to experiences of anger, hostility, resentment, jealousy, attachment to others, sadness, grief, sadness, rage and violence.

5th Chakra- Throat

Mantra- Om Namah Shivaya

Throat Chakra’s color is blue and its sound is YUM.  It is located at the throat and neck space above the collar bone.  The Throat Chakra’s energy is of honesty, mercy, compassionate words, positive words, speaking truth, being heard.  When out of alignment the Throat Chakra may cause babbling, verbal diarrhea, empty words, criticism of self and others, or victimized words.

6th Chakra- Third Eye

Mantra- AUM

The Third Eye’s Chakra color is indigo and its sound is OM.  It is located between the eyebrows, on the forehead. The Third Eye’s energy is of wisdom, intuition, clairvoyants, clairaudient, heightened smell, clairsentience, all knowing, seeing beyond illusions.  When the Third Eye is out of alignment we may experience narrow mindedness, arrogant, narcissistic, stuck in structured paradigms and avidya (ignorance).

Crown Chakra

Mantra- Silent AUM

The Crown Chakra’s color is white light.  It is located at the crown of the head. The Crown Chakra’s energy is our connection to source and divine.  This energy center radiates self realization, self love, expanded consciousness, all seeing, all knowing, all feeling, all sensing, walking between the illusions of the world.  When the Crown Chakra is out of alignment we may experience lack of spirituality, underdeveloped higher self, addictions to substances, belongings and emotions.

Once you have identified which mantra you would like to use to empower and strengthen your chakra system aka life force, try repeating your mantra everyday for 40 days.  I know, 40 days can feel like a lot!  But allow yourself to witness how the sacred sound of this mantra will uplift and empower your inner sound!  You can do this by finding a quite place to sit, relax your body and tune into your breath.  Then state your mantra silently as you inhale and exhale. When we align the helpful mantra vibration with our chakra system we allow ourselves to be even more connected to the divine with in.  This helps our mind to focus and dissolve the ego’s belief that we are separate from each other and divine source.  We are “One Verse”, we are the “Uni-Verse”.  Each one of us plays our part, vibrating our own unique sound in the cosmic band of the universe.  Let us take responsibility for our own sound and vibration we put into the world.

“The path to enlightenment is not a group trip.  It’s between you and God.  This means you’ve got to go inside.  The fewer external distractions and the more concentration you have, the easier it is to get there.”

-Bhagavan Das

Genevieve is committed to serving and helping others come into their wholeness. She is a compassionate teacher that invites all her students to live their truth and celebrate who they are as they are. She is a passionate Reiki Master/Teacher. Genevieve teaches Restorative Yoga with Reiki at Laughing Lotus on Friday from 6:45-8:00pm and Sunday from 6:15-7:30. Her website is http://www.InLightandSoul.com


The Intuitive Ear by Adriana Feliciana

Posted on: June 14th, 2017 No Comments
The practice of Nada Yoga…a time to celebrate the beauty of sound. It makes sense that the first organ developed in the fetus is the ear when you think about sound being the first thing that was made when the Universe was created.
When my children were little, I quickly learned to hone in on the lack of sound – 9 times out of 10 it meant trouble. Once I found my 4 year old son, his little brows knitted together with such silent concentration, as he painted, back and forth in large bold moves, all over my brand new white couch…with my waterproof black mascara.
Now that my children are adults, I am trained to listen to the silent gaps in a conversation that usually mean they have something important to tell me. I can still remember the scary silence I heard when my daughter was trying to tell me she was all grown up and moving out to live on her own. I knew the time was coming, she was over 18, but I still wasn’t ready to hear it. I tried hard to let the silence happen so she could speak,
Staying present and listening to what people are truly saying can be a challenge sometimes. There are so many distractions that can easily lead us astray. Mantras are an excellent way to focus and celebrate the beauty of sound. Easwaran said, “Mantras are handrails for the mind.” So Hum is an excellent mantra for staying present. The meaning of this mantra is simply, “I am.” It helps us enter the ground of our being. Bede Griffiths describes the ground of our being as, “Being present everywhere, in everything, yet always escaping our grasp.”
To practice this mantra, lengthen the spine, roll your shoulders up by your ears, and then press them back to open the heart. Allow your shoulders to melt into your back, and let your heart stay open. As you attune to your breath, use the syllable “So” on the inhalation and “Hum” on the exhalation. Take your time and allow the power of the inner sound to resonate. This mantra can be used in silence with the breath being the only audible sound. Think of it as one of your “pocket mantras” to keep on hand the next time your mind starts to wander during a challenging time or conversation.

Adriana loves yoga because the practice allows her to truly inhabit her body and find a comfortable and livable space deep within. Inspired by Patanjali’s Eight Limbs of Yoga, Adriana blends compassion for all beings with a challenging mindful asana practice that supports where her students are while encouraging them to explore their edge. Come to class with her, and your prana will be stoked through conscious breathing techniques while cultivating inner perceptual awareness and increasing concentration.


Two Trips to the Lake by Josh Ehrenreich

Posted on: May 24th, 2017 No Comments
Recently I went camping in Los Padres National Forest. I had never been and was awestruck by the range of natural beauty it offered. From amazing views gained by mountain hikes to rock hopping along the river bank, it was a great weekend getting back to nature.
And birds. So so many birds. Each morning I would awake to the sounds of birds and those songs would continue past sunset. Everywhere you went you would hear birds eagerly singing out to the world.
One of those places was a small lake. Walking around it, with no trees to impede their chirps, you could hear a clear and resonant call of red-winged blackbirds perched upon a single reeds, bending in to support the gentle weight.
However I was with a large group and hushed bird watching was not the main focus. It was a party, a friend’s birthday. Lots of talking and laughing, moving fast with loud foot steps. Far too many entertaining distractions to choose over the lake and it’s bird songs.
So after we returned to camp, I resolved to head back to the lake. I wanted to experience it distraction free, with no jokes or questions to call my mind away. No footsteps to drown out the call, just sitting and birds.
Free of distraction, I was able to experience the blackbirds’ beautiful song. I could track them swooping into the reeds only to reemerge a minute later and zip over to another spot. I heard songs from unseen birds in trees surrounding and listened to their warble echo across the lake. It was one of my favorite moments of the trip.
Usually when I think of meditation, I think of it as sitting down and being quiet for 10 minutes or so. The transition from preparation to meditation is so quick that I rarely have thought them as separate. But in this case I feel as if the meditation was the walk down to the lake. Meditation was the action to clear my mind of all the distraction and to allow something greater to reveal itself to me.
In the Bhagavad Gita, Krishna instructs his faithful discipline Arjuna “When meditation is mastered, the mind is unwavering like the flame of a lamp in a windless place. In the still mind, in the depths of meditation, the Self reveals itself.”
The ‘reveal’ is not meditation. Meditation is the work to free oneself from the constant distractions of the mind, from the constant wind against the flame. Meditation is a practice to suppress the mind chatter so that we may experience the reveal. It is not a specific thing that we experience in our chosen seat, it is the practice of taking the seat and stilling the mind.
And if what is revealed to you happens to be soundtracked by a choir of birds, so much the better.
Photo credit: rblood

Josh believes in the importance of moving yoga beyond the studio and into everyday life. His strong and even-tempo flow based classes focus on consistency of effort, and attention to breath. Beyond yoga, Josh spends his free time biking, swimming, and listening to hip-hop.


The Art of Meditation by Tina Spogli

Posted on: May 17th, 2017 No Comments

Atha yoganushasanam, Now begins the study of yoga (Patanjali, Sutra 1:1). Please begin in a comfortable seat, crossing the ankles and sitting up nice and tall. Bring your palms face down on your knees, letting there be a soft bend in the elbows so that they drop right below the shoulders. Close the physical eyes. Bring your attention to your breath, with no need to change anything about it, just noticing this breath in, and this breath out. As thoughts or sensations begin to pop up, notice and acknowledge them, then choose to bring the attention back to the breath. Be the observer, watching the thoughts pass with less judgment and attachment to them. Open yourself up fully to everything within and around.  

We are training the mind this month with the magic of meditation. Just as we learn the discipline of body in our asana practice, we learn the discipline of mind in our meditation practice. When we harness and focus the energy of the mind, it can be a powerful tool to help bring us back into the present moment. We can think of meditation as mindfulness, in that we are opening up every part of ourselves to sip in the nectar of NOW. Bringing the energy of mindfulness to wherever we are, and whatever we are doing, is meditation. The Buddhist monk Thich Nhat Hanh says, “Meditation is the practice that consists in bringing the body and the mind back to the present moment, and every time we practice that, we come to life again.” The yoga practice is about waking up, again and again, to the fullness of the moment.

Meditation practices can take many different forms. We can find our focus through the opening of the senses – particularly the eyes with our drishti, meaning ‘soft gaze’ – and other traditional ways including breathing meditation, walking meditation, mantra and chanting, visualization meditation, qi gong, and many others. Any activity that moves your attention into the moment is a meditation. One of my latest favorite ways to meditate is through drawing, a creative outlet from the past resurrected. Letting myself be a clear channel, I sit down with pen and paper and draw what comes, rather than setting an expectation of what the drawing will be beforehand. So much of meditation is an openness to everything around and within us, to be able to observe without judgment and attachment, and to let the divine energy move through us like water flowing in a stream.

Our meditation practice is a discipline, but it’s important to note that we can give our practice permission to change and evolve. I like to cycle through different meditation practices throughout the week, based on what I’m drawn to that day. The moment we tell ourselves we have to meditate in a certain way, creating too many rules and restrictions, we have let the mind take over and leave room for the possibility that we will get stuck or bored. We want to look forward to, and be inspired by, our meditation practice.        
When we give our attention to only one thing, we quiet the thoughts to a whisper and are able to hear the inner voice of truth. Much of our practice becomes being able to look at ourselves completely, the dark and the light, and making peace with all of it. In this way, we accept both sides of ourselves, body and mind working together, the two unite and become one. Those more negative things that have been buried tend to re-surface here. Embarking on any meditation practice takes a warrior strength of heart. We come as we are, and practice embracing our emotions – including the negative ones – with the energy of mindfulness. As Thich Nhat Hanh says, we embrace our emotions with the same love as a mother to a child, or big sister to little sister. Not denying, not judging, but with a level of understanding. This is how we begin to find freedom through our humanity, the freedom that comes from looking deeply, recognizing our wounds, and beginning the process of healing. As we heal ourselves, we heal the world. By living peace within, we manifest peace without. Namaste!

Tina developed a deep love for quieting the body and mind during her time living in one of the loudest cities. Yoga found Tina in 2007 while she was living in New York, and the practice quickly became her sanctuary amidst all of the hustle.

She believes in the transformative process of yoga, with its ability to bring us back into our bodies and breath, and stretch our mental limitations of what we think is possible – both on and off the mat. Her mantra is to come as you are, and observe what unfolds. Tina’s classes are thoughtful and intentional, sharing inspiration from her personal practice and life.

Tina is a 250 RYT, and a graduate from Laughing Lotus in New York and San Francisco. When she is not on the mat, you can find her in nature, exploring photography, and hanging with her animal friends! She is very grateful to be a part of the Laughing Lotus community of the east and west, and is thankful for this space to share her heart and energy with you.


Awareness Before Control by Josh Ehrenreich

Posted on: April 26th, 2017 No Comments
The practice of Pranayama allows us to become more skilled at controlling our breath, but before control comes awareness.
I had a wonderful opportunity to practice this recently. A couple weeks ago I participated in my first race. The day before I had some early pre-race jitters and thought it would be a great opportunity to observe the variety of breath I experienced throughout race day.
The first breath I observed was upon waking and not wanting to think about what was ahead—if I was prepared for the swim, if I could handle the hills. I just focused on breathing in, breathing out, and not getting worked up. This steadiness became more and more difficult to cultivate as start time got closer and closer, right up until I found myself standing at the edge of Lake Berryessa.
And suddenly the breath changed. I am a fairly new swimmer and it still amazes me how foreign breathing feels when swimming through water. I take for granted I can open my mouth and inhale air unobstructed; swimming in the chill of early morning, trying to avoid being kicked or kicking others, I was reminded of how satisfying a free and easy breath of air is.
On the bike, the breath served a different purpose—warming my hands. Cold from the swim, and chilling further from the air racing past I exhaled upon my near frozen fingers as I feebly tried to warm them up. When I could no longer afford to take hands off the handlebars, I imagined each breath penetrating my fingers, waking them from their numbed slumber.
Looping back down the mountain, the breath became more joyous. The gasp at those morning clouds rising off the lake—only an hour prior I had swam right through them. The sigh of relief as the merciful sun broke through and shone upon my fingers and the sensation of feeling returning. The first inhale upon finishing the run, fully stopped, heart galloping, and the satisfaction held within.
Later on, in the afternoon, observing my lungs expanding and contracting, with a napping loved one in my arms. Later still, now alone in my apartment, in front of my altar meditating—experiencing the lengthening of inhale and exhale, each working to further ground me deeper into my seat.
A race day may offer an extreme example but the lesson is universal—our breath changes with us and our encounters throughout the day. Maturity in practice comes with awareness. It is true for Asana, it is true for Pranayama, it is true for everything we undertake.

Josh believes in the importance of moving yoga beyond the studio and into everyday life. His even-tempo flow based classes focus on consistency of effort, breath, and attention. Beyond yoga, Josh spends his free time biking, swimming, and listening to hip-hop.


The Yoga of the Breath by Jasmine Tarkeshi

Posted on: April 12th, 2017 No Comments

This week’s blog post is an Excerpt from Lotus SF Founder, Jasmine Tarkeshi’s New Book: Yoga Mind and Body Handbook-Easy Poses, Guided Meditations: Perfect Peace Wherever You Are. Now available at the Lotus! Join Jasmine for a Class, reading, signing and celebration on Friday, April 14th at 5:30!

Breathe. Let go. And remind yourself that this very moment is the only one you know you have for sure.
Oprah Winfrey


Our breath plays an integral role in the functioning of our entire body and is also a reflection of our state of mind and emotions. Better breathing patterns make us more present and grounded, ready to take on whatever comes our way. When our breathing goes awry, we may find ourselves stressed, overwhelmed, and out of balance. The same is true in reverse: when were happy and healthy, we tend to breathe easier. With conscious breathing, we can impact our inner world.

What Is Good Breathing?

Learning to consciously regulate our breath is one of the most powerful tools we can cultivate. It helps us control our emotions and let go. As we covered earlier in the book, yogic breathing practices are called pranayama, which means to control or extend the breath. Prana is our life force and ayama means to extend. With slow, regulated breathing, the quality of our lives improves dramatically. 

When we are stressed, our breath becomes shallow. We breathe quickly and only fill up the top part of our lungs with oxygen. Our chest barely expands with each inhale, which triggers our flight or fight stress response.

In contrast, when were fully relaxed and present, our breath becomes slower and deeper. This triggers our restand-digest response, which lowers our heart rate. With each inhale, our entire chest and belly expand, flooding us with oxygen. With each exhale, we fully contract all of these parts of the body, releasing carbon dioxide. In this manner, each full inhale nourishes every part of our being, while each complete exhale cleanses and releases toxins from the mind and body.

Why does all of this matter? Well, the average human being takes over 20,000 breaths a day. Each breath brings us the opportunity to positively affect our state of mind and benefit our overall health. When we talk about good breathing, were talking about a conscious slow, even, and deep breath that satisfies our need for oxygen, and also helps us maintain a calm and present state of mind. With conscious breathing comes conscious living. This is what we strive for in yoga. 

Breathing Techniques

Yoga uses a variety of breathing or pranayama techniques to help facilitate different outcomes. Ujjayi breathing, which we discussed earlier , is one of the most common types of yogic breathing. Most often used during asana, it allows us to create a steady,even rhythmic, breath and link our breath to movement. In this practice, every inhale is a movement that expands the chest, such as inhaling the arms up, and every exhale promotes a contraction, such as exhaling a forward bend. The inhale accompanies a movement (such as reaching the arms up), and the exhale accompanies another movement (such asmoving into a forward bend). There are also slight pauses between breaths to help us experience stillness.

Long, deep breathing is used to calm the mind during meditation or any time youre in a stressful situation. This breath focuses on expanding and contracting the belly to engage the diaphragm and create a slow, even breath with a slightly longer exhale. This allows for space to calm the nerves, quiet the mind, and let go. 

When youre feeling sluggish, a bellows breath can be just what you need. The exercise pumps the breath from the belly rapidly, stimulating the effects of aerobic exercise, including increased metabolism, increased heart rate, and release of serotonin to the brain. 

Alternate nose breathing, where you use your thumb and pointer finger to alternately cover each nostril, is thought to balance the left and right hemispheres of the brain and balance our emotional state.   

All of these techniques can help you breathe better to live better.

Complete instruction on all the breathing practices available in the book! 

Jasmine Tarkeshi is the Co-Founder of Laughing Lotus Yoga Centers in NYC and SF. She is a devoted student of Yoga for over 25 years and grateful teacher for 20 years. Jasmine has dedicated her life to being of service to Yoga’s transformative teachings and holy teachers through her weekly lasses at Laughing Lotus Yoga Centers SF, Teacher Trainings, International workshops, online videos and now, published book! For more details: http://sf.laughinglotus.com/jasminetarkeshi/


How Pranayama Cured My Fear of Heights by Robin Wilner

Posted on: April 5th, 2017 No Comments

I’m standing on a platform thirty feet high, trying with every fiber of my being NOT to look down at the 1900 seats filled with people. It’s the climax of the second act of “Wicked” on Broadway, and I’m about to become a flying monkey over the excited audience. My face and chest are flushed hot with fear, the monkey mask hovering over my nose and mouth makes it difficult to breathe. For all I know I could be 100 feet high. What I do know is that the harness engulfing my torso pulls my shoulders to a hunch and pinches my groin, and the single wire suspended at my mid back is the only thing keeping me from plummeting down onto all those theatre goers. In a few seconds, I’ll be released forward in a surge of momentum, soaring like an acrobat over the strangers below. But I still can’t breathe, and an uncontrollable panic sets in.

Then I remember my yoga practice. Inhaling through my nose is virtually impossible, and the short breaths I’ve been gasping through my mouth are only aiding my anxiety. So I begin to constrict the back of my throat and practice deep, rhythmic Ujjayi (pronounced oo-ja-yee) breaths. Inhale. Exhale. Inhale. Exhale. Panic begins to subside, and my heart rate slows to an even pace. The tension in my back, shoulders and hips has released a bit, my fists have unclenched. And as I bend my knees there is a stability and readiness to my stance. Once squeezed shut, my eyes now open to receive my surroundings with clarity. Inhale. Exhale. Inhale. Exhale.

The crew guy behind me yanks down hard on the cables and off I gooooooooo…..exhale! Inhale. Exhale. Inhale. Exhale. I’m actually floating through mid air to the rhythm of my breathing! By the time I land safely back on the platform, I’m filled with exhilaration and the anxiety has completely vanished.

Prana is life force, and yama means to expand. So when we practice forms of pranayama – yogic breathing – we quite literally expand our life force, liberating ourselves from that which may bind us physically, emotionally, mentally and even spiritually. Translated as “victorious” or “oceanic” breath, the Ujjayi pranayama creates a synchronicity between body and breath and offers tremendous benefit to the cardiovascular and nervous systems. Helpful at releasing frustration or irritability, Ujjayi encourages a free flow of prana throughout the subtle body and a sense of calm and ease.

Other benefits of Ujjayi include:

  • Enhanced self-awareness
  • Blood pressure regulation
  • Relief of muscle tension
  • Increased energy and internal heat
  • Helping the yogi keep a steady rhythm during asana (movement) practice

To practice, keep the mouth open and exhale on a “HAAAAH” sound, as if you were fogging up a mirror; then keeping the mouth open, inhale on an “AAAAH” sound like an elongated gasp. Do this a few times, then close the lips and see if you can maintain the same sound while gently constricting the back of the throat. The more comfortable you become with this practice, the more your breath will mimic the sounds of the ocean.

Great times to practice Ujjayi:

  • When you feel irritated or stressed – since Ujjayi breath is especially good for settling and balancing the mind.
  • During your asana practice – as it helps you stay focused and centered while you flow between postures.
  • If you feel nervous or anxious – since the slow, rhythmic nature of this pranayama practice helps to calm the nervous system.
  • While exercising – because Ujjayi can improve respiratory efficiency during aerobic exercise like running and cycling (or aerial flying :))

Fear is merely a state of mind, and we can use pranayama to shift our state. With my newfound skill to breathe deeply, steadily and be present – free from the anxiety of being up high – I actually developed an unhindered, pure joy while performing this feat. You, too, can empower yourself with this ancient yogic practice…happy breathing!

Formerly a Broadway dancer/singer/actress in NYC, Robin mixes her love of movement, chanting, energetic healing and yoga philosophy into all her teachings. She believes that human potential is infinite and that the path to joy starts with mindfulness and self-transformation. She is also a Holistic Nutritionist. www.nutritiousyogini.com
Classes: Mondays 12pm, Fridays 12pm & 5:30pm or Sundays at 10am.


The Rainbow Bridge by Genevieve McClendon

Posted on: March 29th, 2017 No Comments

“May we live like the lotus, forever rooted in the muddy waters.”

-Judith Lasater

In every class that I’ve attended with my teacher, she states, “May we be like the lotus, forever rooted in the muddy waters.”  I appreciate this mantra and reminder because it allows me to honor the importance of being deeply rooted within myself and the divine.  A way we can create this relationship is through the rainbow bridge of the subtle body and chakras. Through alchemizing the chakras we can root into our own true nature and feel fully alive and present in our lives.  In yoga we honor the subtle body and belief that everyone has an energy field and aura.  We acknowledge that each being radiates their own unique vibration of life force. This subtle body is made up of an aura which is made up of layers around the body composed of energy from the chakras.  There are seven major chakras which are spinning orbs of energy that run from the base of the spine to the crown of the head. The chakras  are also connected to 12 meridian channels that move chi up and down the body through the fascia or connective tissues.  Within the fascia there are 72,000 tubular like structures connected to the circulatory system of our body called Nadis.  These seven major chakras are spinning wheels of light or “life batteries” that are our life force. At the base of our body we have feet and legs that root into the earth connecting us to the root chakra and drawing nourishment.  At the crown of our head lives the crown chakra, also known as the 1,000 petal lotus connecting us to the divine.  It’s as if our spine grows out of our pelvic bowl to reach the light of the sun.  From the roots to the crown there is a rainbow bridge or chakra system that draws connection of the earth self to the spiritual self.  The union of the individual and divine.

The Rainbow Bridge:

Root Chakra

On the rainbow bridge the Root Chakra’s color is red.  It is based at the bottom of tail bone.  The Root Chakra’s energy is stability, feeling safe, security, and standing up under pressure.  When Root Chakra is out of alignment one may experience fear, insecurity, no courage, muscle and structural weakness, hip, knee and foot problems.

2nd Chakra – Sacral Plexus

The Sacral Plexus is the color orange.  It is right above the Root Chakra in the pelvic bowl.  The Sacral Chakra energy radiates powerful emotional and creative forces, along with movement, sensuality, and relationship to ourselves and others.  When the Sacral Plexus is out of alignment we may feel controlling, guilty, frigid, dependent, a lack of creativity, close minded, emotionally stuck, difficulty in relationships.

3rd Chakra – Solar Plexus

The Solar Plexus color is yellow.  It radiates in the belly right above the Sacral Plexus. This energy center holds self-confidence, self-empowerment, honesty, digesting life easily, courageousness and authenticity.  When the Solar Plexus is out of alignment one may experience shame, powerlessness, shyness, worry, victimization.

4th Chakra – Heart

The Heart Chakra is green.  It shines at the heart and chest right above the Solar Plexus.  It is the energy center where the earth self and the divine self connect.  The Heart Chakra’s energy when in alignment is of love, compassion, forgiveness, acceptance of others, open heartedness, connected mind and heart, joyfulness, happiness, gratitude and grace.  When out of alignment the Heart Chakra may contribute to experiences of anger, hostility, resentment, jealousy, attachment to others, sadness, grief, sadness, rage and violence.

5th Chakra – Throat

Throat Chakra’s color is blue.  It is located at the throat and neck space above the collar bone.  The Throat Chakra’s energy is of honesty, mercy, compassionate words, positive words, speaking truth, being heard.  When out of alignment the Throat Chakra may cause babbling, verbal diarrhea, empty words, criticism of self and others, or victimized words.  

6th Chakra – Third Eye

The Third Eye’s Chakra color is indigo.  It is located between the eyebrows, on the forehead. The Third Eye’s energy is of wisdom, intuition, clairvoyants, clairaudient, heightened smell, clairsentience, all knowing, seeing beyond illusions.  When the Third Eye is out of alignment we may experience narrow mindedness, arrogant, narcissistic, stuck in structured paradigms, avidya (ignorance).

Crown Chakra

The Crown Chakra’s color is white light.  It is located at the crown of the head. The Crown Chakra’s energy is our connection to source and divine.  This energy center radiates self realization, self love, expanded consciousness, all seeing, all knowing, all feeling, all sensing, walking between the illusions of the world.  When the Crown Chakra is out of alignment we may experience lack of spirituality, underdeveloped higher self, addictions to substances, belongings and emotions.

Each of the seven energy centers are incredibly important as they dictate how we relate to the world, ourselves and the cosmos.  We can empower ourselves by learning about the chakras and which chakras within our own energy field need support and harmony. Through yoga and awareness of the Chakra’s we can root more deeply into our true nature and create inner peace, honoring our subtle body and giving it the support it needs so we can flourish and be fully alive. Living deeply rooted in the muddy waters so we can be the lotus.

“On our journey through life, the chakras are the wheels along the axis that take the vehicle of the Self along our evolutionary quest, across the Rainbow Bridge, to reclaim our divine nature once again.”

-Anodea Judith

Genevieve is committed to serving and helping others come into their wholeness. She is a compassionate teacher that invites all her students to live their truth and celebrate who they are as they are. She is a passionate Reiki Master/Teacher. Genevieve teaches Restorative Yoga with Reiki at Laughing Lotus on Friday from 6:45-8:00pm and Sunday from 6:15-7:30. Her website is http://www.InLightandSoul.com.


Road Map to the Soul by Alex Crow

Posted on: March 8th, 2017 No Comments

There’s no use looking for road signs.

The language of the soul is in waves

Pulsing and flowing, dancing through the body.

Channels of light and sound

Carving and curving 

Like the breath 

Through the lungs. 

To dance is to let the soul speak.

Poetry is where the abstract and the logical meet.

Inside, there are deep oceans, rivers, streaming back and forth from the source.

Spleen & stomach, a mountain range.

Brain, a far away galaxy.

Heart, a fire pit.

Intestines, undertows.

Womb,  a black whole.

Walking the edge of my spine, I rise through layers of Red Earth & Deep Water, until meeting the Sun in my belly.  Her fire gives life to the Green Forest of my heart and lungs. I rise through the blue of sky and sound until finally reaching the level of Eagle, his Vision seeing through all illusion.  Spirit reaches in, and I loose sense. 

All contained and yet uncontainable.

This invisible road map leaves subtle messages, visions, callings, colors, like bread crumbs to follow when the soul gets lost. Follow them home.  

…Waves crashing 

in(hale), and out 

Like the breath. 

Soothing us with that slow rhythm.

Guiding us home. 

Alex Crow teaches regularly at Laughing Lotus Yoga Center in San Francisco. She is also a Reiki Master and a co-founder of vîv, an all female Bay Area dance collective.


Living Our Practice: Love in Action by Tina Spogli

Posted on: February 8th, 2017 No Comments

In yoga class, we often stress leading with the heart in most asana poses. And surely if you’ve been practicing for some length of time, you know that returning to the mat again and again requires a certain amount of both discipline and devotion – devotion meaning to engage with love. There is a strength of will, but also a strength of heart, when we embark on our spiritual journey. In recent days, it has become even more important to truly live our practice, to wake up, to open our eyes and hearts to a world that needs more love in the battle against hate. The quote from MLK Jr. “Darkness cannot drive out darkness, only light can do that; hate cannot drive out hate, only love can do that” has been my mantra lately. The practice of yoga has always been a reLOVEution, removing the veil of separation between us and other, and seeing all life as interconnected.

The bhakti yogi sees the Divine in all living creatures  – in our friends, in animals, in the plants and trees and mountains. When we talk about love in yoga, it is this type of unconditional love. As we begin to remove the veils of ignorance, we realize the work is less about cultivating love, and more about surrendering to it. Indeed this universal energy, cosmic consciousness, The Great Spirit, God, or whatever you’d like to call the source of all things, LOVES us. Imagine that for a moment. Each of us is already loved by the universe, and not in  a tame kind of way, but in a wild, fierce, unconditional type of way. The work we do as yogis is to open up to this love, to surrender ourselves as we are, which requires seeing both the light and dark sides of ourselves – a bit scary and not simple, I know!

The work of the bhakti yogi is dynamic – it happens simultaneously inside and outside. Bhakti yoga urges us to ask the hard questions before we act and speak: What is the intention? Is the act coming from the heart? Is it kind? Is it true? Is it necessary? Just like different organs in the body play different roles, so do we each play our own unique role in the world. However, the heart remains our center and lifeline, so that we become instruments of love in all that we do. One of the most beautiful bhakti sutras says, “Love is manifest where there is an able vessel” (Verse 53). An able vessel is one free of self-expectation and willing to lay their soul out to the universe.

In the Bhagavad Gita, Krishna tells the warrior Arjuna that the way to him is not through inaction, but through selfless action. Our participation in the world is seva, a sanskrit term that can be translated as “love in action.” We are connected to our brothers and sisters, to this Earth, to the plants and animals, to the rivers and the oceans. We know that our own freedom is bound in the freedom of all beings. Love is an action, and in the process we build the bridge to each other.

Come to sit in a comfortable seat. Bring your right hand to your heart, and your left fingertips to the Earth outside the left thigh, in this Earth witness mudra. Our left fingertips on the Earth represent our connection to the world, and our right palm at our heart is a commitment to act with love. Close your physical eyes, come into your breath, and sit up a little bit taller. Focus on lengthening the inhales and exhales. Think of someone in your life right now that could use some compassion. Hold the image of that being in your heart. With each inhale, imagine yourself receiving love from The Great Spirit. With each exhale, imagine giving that same love to your person.

I leave you with words from Ganga White:

“What if our religion was each other
If our practice was our life
If prayer, our words
What if the temple was the Earth
If forests were our church
If holy water – the rivers, lakes, and ocean
What if meditation was our relationships
If the teacher was life
If wisdom was self-knowledge
If love was the center of our being.”

Namaste.

Tina developed a deep love for quieting the body and mind during her time living in one of the loudest cities. Yoga found Tina in 2007 while she was living in New York, and the practice quickly became her sanctuary amidst all of the hustle.

She believes in the transformative process of yoga, with its ability to bring us back into our bodies and breath, and stretch our mental limitations of what we think is possible – both on and off the mat. Her mantra is to come as you are, and observe what unfolds. Tina’s classes are thoughtful and intentional, sharing inspiration from her personal practice and life.

Tina is a 250 RYT, and a graduate from Laughing Lotus in New York and San Francisco. When she is not on the mat, you can find her in nature, exploring
photography, and hanging with her animal friends! She is very grateful to be a
part of the Laughing Lotus community of the east and west, and is thankful for
this space to share her heart and energy with you.